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influencing the important debates about both foreign and domestic policy. and in particular, capped efforts to put the cause of affordable quality health care for every american back on the national agenda was essential. so the ideas that sprung from cap began influencing debate and it no longer seemed unusual or a little bit of a novelty to have cap at the table make the case. evidence-based policy formulation and around the world. as i travelled as secretary of state, it was not uncommon for me to be asked about cap particularly by leaders who can have a infrastructure to support their views on their country. you talk about marrying the ideas with activists to know how to carry the ideas forward. the movement for history for rights and civil rights for organized labor for clean air and water has been so much more have been advanced by men and women who gather the data, marshal the arguments. wrote, spoke, marched, advocated, just like cap. people make claims and arguments that have no basis in evidence. but which are i'd logically motivate motivated. mothers worried they won't get the hel
own foreign policy side have been with this freeze movement but it will embarrass the president so let's cool that while they are crying because they know they can win the fight. so not just about praying with those guys it is the big stuff expressing a common patriotism i think that was there. also always been able to talk. willing to talk because in a marriage you attitude be able to communicate. the jokes and the parties in the toast kept the door open he could call reagan to say mr. president is after 6:00 they could negotiate these deals and that is what this book is about. i think that is it. willingness to talk is the most important fact is dead serious. evil -- secretary louis things we have enough but we're not sure because receipts committee people pay their taxes and you don't know how expensive is moved around. to but this is my pitch that we don't pay attention and make some kind of agreement before the 17th. people say you should be religious but if there is a heaven or hell also assume there is? that is a good decision but nobody wants to find out. [laughter] we don't kn
intentions, what they call leadership intentions, foreign policy objectives, human rights and then threats of the financial system. i find the last one to the financial system. what threats to the financial system does the vatican pose? >> that's a bit of a head scratcher because it doesn't have a particularly large amount of economic clout. occasionally they make comments about policy suggestion for how to help the world economy and how to help the world develop particularly in the developing world but it doesn't wield a lot of financial power. it isn't that big financially. it does have an institute. now, there's the institute for the works of religion which is kind of a bank that's set up to help coordinate charitable activities and currently the pope -- both pope francis and pope benedict had been working to kind of clean up some of the activity and put the vatican bank in a more rigorous footing. but it's a small bank in the scale of things. and so i don't really know what kind of threats they would imagine the holy sea would pose. >> it's very, very interesting i appreciate you givin
. lou: always good to talk with you. come back soon. much more on the president's foreign policy and its failures with the "a-team" next. stay with us. who is responsible for the obamacare mess? should obamacare be fixed or just scrub? for health and human services secretary michael leavitt joins us next. ♪ as a business owner, i'm constantly putting out fires. so i deserve a small business credit card with amazing rewards. with the spark cascard from capital one, i get 2% cash back on ery purchase, every day. i break my back around here. finally soone's recognizing me with unlimited rewards! meetings start at 11, cindy. [ male announcer get the spark business card from capital one. choose 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every d. what's in your wallet? i need your timesheets, larry! what's in your wallet? at od, whatever business you're in, that's the business we're in with premium service like one of the best on-time delivery records and a low claims ratio, we do whatever it takes to make your business our business. od. helping the world keep promises. lou: an explosiv
. lou: always good to talk with you. come bac soon. much more on the president's foreign policy and its failures with the "a-team" next. stay with us. who is responsible for the obamacare mess? should obamacare be fixed or just scrub? for health and human services secretary michael leavitt joins us next. ♪ lou: an explosive new book entitled double down focusing on potential 2016 candidates and according to authors, mitt romney's decided he could not choose new dirt -- new jersey's governor as running mate because his background was littered with land mines. allegedly had unanswered questions concerning a defamation lawsuit, his medical history, and this time as a securities industry lobbyist. another major revelation in the book, the president's top aides secretly considering replacing vice president biden on the 2012 ticket with then secretary of state hillary clinton. the last time the federal government delivered a new health care benefit to more than 40 billion people, our next guest was in charge, health and human services secretary when the bush administration unveiled medicare
said on june 14th in a foreign policy speech the danger of figuring in an irrational accidental war was quite great. how would you minimize the chance if you were president of such a war? >> i think communication is, of course, the only means, and also to make quite precise our guarantees. you have a situation now with cuba where mr. khrushchev is threatening if we take any action. we don't know exactly what action would bring about the rain of rockets, but you cannot continue to move from area to area, where we threaten them with war to meet our commitments. they threaten us. they increase their commitments, which they are trying to do in cuba. i would say this presents a constant hazard, because we could all be destroyed. i'd think we'd have to make very precise our commitments and then attempt to maintain communication with the soviet union, which i think, of course, is going to present us with one of the great problems. i'd say communication, good ambassadors, frequent meetings of the foreign ministers and be quite precise and inform them of actions we're about to take. >> would
states remains what he called the cornerstone of japan's foreign policy. >>> in the middle east, a leading egyptian satirist and television soviet to america's jon stewart yanked off the air. yousaf made fun of the leader. a huge cake adorned were the the image of the army chief. >>> tunisia barred from the davis cup. the international tins federation imposed the punishment after tunisian player was ordered not to play against another player. there is no room for prejudice in the sport. >>> and designated newborn to either male or female. that section of the birth certificate can be left blank. the idea, decide what to dop if the child is born with both male and female sex characteristics. estimates say that occurs in as many as 1 in 2,000 births. m for male, f for female or x, , for those calling themselves intersex. >>> and now back to that attack at l.a.x. yesterday. for more about its possible repurchase cushions joined from washington by rafi rhan, security expert and the former director of security a benghazi in tel aviv. the first thing most of asking this morning, what d
of conduct of foreign policy since u.s. revolutionary war times, since the beginning of history you have had pies. what is different is technology, the capability to listen in to everything. and i think that that is what the administration is dealing with is technology so different we'll have to think about new rules of the road. >> i was going to say in this question of running amuck being on auto pilot you used that borrowed, that ask what sect of state kerry said. you add this technological capability if it's running on auto pilot and people who are overseeing don't know what it's doing, then it has this control and overseers don't know what it's doing and one of the amazing things what nsa was doing with google and yahoo! scraping all of their data out of the area that ability does make it seem like the nsa has found new mothers for itself that the people who were supposed to other sees, supposed to keep this kelp del cat wall between safety and civil liberties they don't know what is going on. >> the mystery here is the between what john said they can do and what they actually are doin
foreign relations committee. fact, he has been a leader and virtually every foreign- policy issue for the united states over the past three decades. this year, he became the first sitting chairman of that committee in over a century to become secretary of state. two weeks ago, i was honored to travel to asia with senator where-- secretary kerry you push key initiatives like the chance to civic -- trans-p acific partnership. he has knowledge and global reach in this leader said position -- leadership position. ladies and gentlemen, let's give a warm welcome to a national hero, and then he would dedicate his life to serve the united states in a tireless and can do dealing with the tough issues that face our world. lease help me welcome my friend secretary of state, john kerry. [applause] >> good morning. thank you. there's a very much. thank you for an extraordinary introduction. based on the introduction, i accept the nomination. [laughter] only kidding. i'm out of that now. you, a couple of months before i was out of the job of being secretary stay, i'm still serving and the u.s.
on the president's foreign policy, failures we take up with the a-team, stay with us, much more ahead. >> laughingstock. that is what leading republican senator john boa boar aso calls kathleen sebelius, he is next. so ally bank has a raise your rate cd that wothat's correct.a rate. cause i'm really nervous about getting trapped. why's that? uh, mark? go get help! i have my reasons. look, you don't have to feel trapped with our raise your rate cd. if our rate on this cd goes up, yours can too. oh that sounds nice. don't feel trapped with the ally raise your rate cd. ally bank. your money needs an ally. lou: a third gun manufacturing company has announced it is leaving the state of new york over governor andrew cuomo's sweeping new anti-gun laws. american tactical imports, the name of the firm is moving to south carolina taking a reported to have million dollars in recesses with it, one of the nation's oldest and largest gun manufacturers. it may be arriving in some form. a team of computer experts is being brought in to help the obama administration determine whether there is of fakes
views, thank you. >> thank you. lou: much more on the president's foreign policy, failures we take up with the a-team, stay with us, much more ahead. >> laughingstock. that is what leading republican senator john boa boar aso calls kathleen sebelius, he is next. so i can reach ally bank 24/7, but there are no branches? 24/7. i'm sorry, i'm just really reluctant to try new things. really? what's wrong with trying new things? look! mommy's new vacuum! (cat screech) you feel that in your muscles? i do... drink water. it's a long story. well, not having branches let's us give you great rates and service. i'd like that. a new way to bank. a better way to save. ally bank. your money needs an ally. once wrote something on a sheet of paper and placed it in his factory for all to see. ♪ four simple words where the meaning has never been lost. the challenge always accepted. and the calling forever answered. ♪ introducing the all-new 2014 s-class. mercedes-benz. the best or nothing. lou: a third gun manufacturing company has announced it is leaving the state of new york over governor andrew
challenge against our country's foreign policies are not exactly exercising the wisdom of solomen. i'm not so much concerned about the plant spending that will be reduced, as is getting policy that is promote work and dignity in this effort. the house bill would return a food stamp policy to work in order to self food stamp benefits. i recognize that perception sometimes trumps reality to this town. but i hope we can settle while asking people to work the return for food stamp programs is not any form of cruel or unusual punishment. the dignity of work has long been a common theme throughout all the ages. finally, throughout the conference, i'll be working to avoid facing undue regulatory burdens. >>> rep zen tich costa is to finally put the gypsa debate to rest, which as we now understand being a pretty fouled experiment. i look forward to a success chl treatment of this farm bill as we move forward in the next five years. >> the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentle lady from minnesota. >> thank you very much. mr. chairman, i want to first thing our incredible chai
allegations threaten to disrupt foreign policy with u.s. allies. >> i think the revelations from snowden and the secrets revealed are doing significant damage to our bilateral relationships with germany, with mexico, with the other countries to where the suggestion is that we've listened in. i think we have repair work to do and hard questions to ask of the n.s.a. about what's really happening in this program. >> congressman peter king, the chairman of the house homeland security committee said america should stop apologizing. >> the reality is the n.s.a. has saved thousands of lives in the united states, france and germany and throughout europe. the french is someone to talk. they have carried out spying operations against the united states, both the government and industry. as far as germany, that's where the hamburg blot began which started 9/11. the french and germans and other european countries, we are not doing this for the fun of it. >> former vice president dick cheney agrees the u.s. should remain cautious. >> the overall capabilities are important and need to be preserved. >>
it was a foreign policy question. when reagan was running against ford in the primaries, reagan had in the speeches time and time again reference to the panama canlt. it did not resonate until one night in florida it blew the roof off to the place he was speaking. reagan never lost his place was stimmied. he didn't expect the places -- applause there. it it had do with the complication of foreign policy at the time mo -- if you had to have a book shelf of explanations what you're doing is right or wrong. just oppose it. it may be wrong and current productive. if works because of what you talked about and works in a political sense because it's a populous appeal to the frustrations who has every right to be frustrated and every right to be upset about the way things are in washington. what is the response to the tea party? you have 18 poem -- people in washington saying what is their plan? it's not the job of the american people to come up with a plan. it's a job to say we don't like it or we do. we hired you guys to come up with a plan and implement it. now you do it. that's not the way the reelect
is the embargo still in place? >> well, it's hard to think about more counter productive foreign policy than the u.s. embargo. here we have 180 plus nations in the united nations voting against a country who's supposedly the beacon of liberty around the world in favor of a ruthless brutal dictatorship because of the the embargo. i cannot think of a policy that has served the opposite purpose of the goal towards cuba. i mean, after 50 years of the embargo in place, cuba is not any closer to becoming a democracy than in 1960, so i think it's pretty clear that it is an utter failure. >> this is the 22nd year in a row the u.n. voted on this issue. last year, three voted in favor of the sufficient, this year only two, israel being the second. is the u.s. growing more and more isolated on this issue and what does it signal? >> the tiny island of paolo was the other country that voted last year in favor of the united states. i think the embargo is quite the useful tool for the cuban regime. look at what's going on. it helps the cuban regime to rally the entire world behind them and against the unit
. and finally, turn to what is the -- what do the implications of this an how we implement foreign policy. with that sort of an overarching on the topic i like to see us cover. i'm going it start with the first question on the threat we face and why we need -- feel we need security. if there are no benefits with e wouldn't have be having the discussion. with that, george, i would like to turn to you. how has the threat of terrorism changed over the past decade and how have our security and -- it's changed, henry, i think a few relatively significant ways. first, it is a threat than it was ten to fifteen years ago. it's not necessarily aligned bay group by ideology and other driving factors which may be complaint about how we are conducting ourselves in their view. secondly, the threat seems to progress at time very rapidly. what may appear to be a localized threat today perhaps in some obscure part of the world could in fact be on the doorstep tomorrow. lastly, it has significantly. they don't necessarily appear based on their actions and recent actions are indicators of that. that necess
regimes that are in fact very difficult for the united states in foreign policy. so there are many different interrelations here that unfortunately seem to be getting more serious by the day and we have a panel that i think is certainly one of the best panels one could possibly put together to talk about this. the real top experts in the united states on this subject. our first panelist is spike bowman who is a specialist in national security law and policy. most recently he served as the deputy of the national counterintelligence executive. he served before that is the senior research fellow at the national defense university and prior to that he was in the senior executive service federal bureau of investigation is the senior counsel for national security law and is director of the intelligence issues group at the national security branch. please join me in welcoming spike bowman. [applause] >> thank you, john. when we think of organized crime i think most of us incorporated about the east coast of the united states when we look at the crime families and things like that and we t
strategy in the iranian foreign policy. the essential question is did sanctions work? >> it's difficult to come up with an explanation as to why it is in the presidential elections six of the seven candidates criticized the previous negotiator. unless there was some impact sanctions were having on the debate in iran. it's difficult to see why it is his focus on the economy would have been so successful unless the sanctions were having some impact in iran's economy. it's difficult to see why it is that after several years which iran seemed entirely uninterested in a nuclear deal we have a new nuclear negotiating team that is obviously interested in reaching a deal as quickly as possible. unless the sanctions were having some impact on iran. and i think one of the people whose opinion we should listen to in the matter is mr. -- who said repeatedly the sanction we're having a dramatic impact on iran. and it change and approach was necessary. so from the perspective of the obama administration, -- as i have written several monograph. the obama team from the beginning always thought the sanc
just to vent his private -- >> he attracted 1600 people. but he says they were foreign policy types and journalists and -- >> i'm talking about the broader picture, the bigger picture of why twitter has become what it's become. >> this is what twitter is like. >> i just feel like this is what i deal with on a daily basis. i can't say the things on air that are said on a regular basis. >> you say something on the air and -- >> and you get back the "c" word, whatever. you get called everything in the book, you're ugly, you're a bimbo, you're an air head. >> some want you to be killed. >> so any woman in the media will tell you this is what happens to them. and if you're a woman of color, they're racist comments. that is really what -- talk to michelle malkin, people will tell you this is what happens. i mean, reading his tweets are just like reading my feed on my twitter page. >> joseph joseph said in a statement after lost his job that this started out as a paridy account. but obviously, he's a smart guy and so he just wondered why people would do that as opposed to somebody who has
, you would probably be upset, you could understand it at some level because spying is part of foreign policy, but you are a human being and you would be ticked off and she is. >> united states is not the only country that spies on world leaders. madeline albright said that once she was at the united nations and said. >> rick: a french are ambassador asked her about something she said on a phone call. this is not unusual that people spy. >> a group of soldiers in mosl, injured more than 150, it raises this month's death toll to 545 people killed. a surge in sectarian violence has killed more than 500,000 people around iraq. >>> in line with agreement to eliminate all of the weapons by mid 2014. al jazeera's kimberly dukehart has more. >>> syria is meeting an ambitious deadline set by opcew to destroy its lethal stockpile by next year. syria handed over the detail thursday ahead of its october 27th deadline. opcw is not releasing what their report says but it did say the syrian government disclosed 23 chemical weapon sights, the head said last week that the country has so far been coo
of the faith. i came to realise that islamism was a grievance. up until that point i was aggrieved by foreign policy. islamism was the largest obstacle preventing muslim societies from progressing. i was someone driven by a sense of injustice. i wanted to seek for justice. that would entail challenging the islamist ideology. if i realised that it was an obstacle to the advancement of muslim society. we grounded quinn lamb. >> we have a question from a huer. >>> jd rosen asks is reduction of drone war fair an effective countermeasure against new extremist recruitment? >> so i've been critical of uab, drone strikes. if the policy is carrick cattured as democracy at the barrel of the gun, was bush's stance. if the leadership of al qaeda was dealt with by drone strikes, president obama felt he could deal with the problem. it's an ideology, an inurgency, not just an organization. president obama's organization said al qaeda inspired terrorist. it's the end product. >> you write in reference to al qaeda - you can't kill an idea. ideas are bulletproof. what is it that the united states can do. what
capability is enormously important to the united states to the foreign policy to defense matters and economic matters and i'm a strong supporter of it. >> reporter: jim sciutto, cnn, washington. >>> our thanks to jim. >>> healthcare.gov is apparently off life support this morning. the obama care website back online after suffering a nationwide network outage over the weekend. later this morning, testifying at the congressional hearing will be an administration for the medicare and medicaid services. 325,000 people have now been able to sign up for private insurance through obama care state-run marketplaces. cnn has learned health and human services secretary kathleen sebelius missed an extended deadline set by house committee to turn over documents about the healthcare.gov website and could trigger a congressional subpoena from republicans. >>> lindsey graham is trying to hold up all nominations for federal positions until the outpost in benghazi appear in congress. they say they sent someone there on the night of the attack. the white house is accusing republicans of playing politics with th
, american foreign policy towards syria. the meeting, the deputy prime minister re-engagement with elements of the assad regime and shows americans deep involved and engagement in pushing for a political settlement inside syria. interesting developments there. i want to move on and talk about the meeting between peace envoy lakhdar brahimi, who was expected to hold talks with president assad. lakhdar brahimi says he has seen assad playing a role in a new syria, but not as a leader. do you think this is something assad is likely to agree to? >> not at all. in fact, not only assad would not agree to what mr lakhdar brahimi publicly stated, lakhdar brahimi yesterday tried to distance himself from his own announcement on syrian television, saying the statement was taken out of context. president assad warned lakhdar brahimi to stay faithful to his mission, not to make any statements outside of his mission. the reality is that there is a stalemate in the syrian crisis. the reality is the syrian opposition is divided. the assad regime is not going to make a compromise or really give the oppositio
. if you follow iraq's foreign policy you would see iraq is acting independently and freely according to its own interest and not according to the interest of any other country. we have a partnership and agreement with the united states but this is something some countries do not like but we like it because we believe nits our interest to have relationship with the united states. if others do not agree that's their problem. they cannot impose anything on iraqis. if they want to be our friend. our friendship does not impose on us being enmies of others. >> how do you respond to critics -- this is a question asked by somebody else -- who say you are consolidating power around you and this has adversely affected iraq's democratic process? >> the constitution is in iraq. it gives peroggatives and i state let me know when i act in an unconstitutional way. if i act in a way that is not accept to believe some of our partners this is something else. as long as i'm committed to respecting the constitution and as long as i use my prerogatives in a constitutional way there shouldn't be a problem
he has seen the european policy advisor and foreign policy advisor cath rich ashton over the last few months and with african allegation to see he was properly cared for and the message by his family is he was properly carried for and well treated, but the authorities, whether they would allow the legal team access or whether it was the legal team wasn't given access because he didn't want to talk to lawyers. if he is saying i'm the president and if he is still saying i have nothing to defend, then what is he going to talk about? they would have been looking at what happened in early december last year, what the charges relate to, outside the presidential court there and we have a huge antisitting and that was cleared and the charges were more than that and there were more that were killed that night but not bringing those up in court because the other people that died were muslim brotherhood. they are only referring to those who were not and the charges relate to insightment to commit murder. so we understand and we don't know this because we have not been told but the prosecution's
>>> the country's top diplomat is on a foreign policy triage mission. secretary of state john kerry is busy mending fences with middle eastern allies unhappy with what president obama is doing and not doing. chief washington correspondent james rosen takes a look. >> reporter: it was the largest anti-american demonstration in iran in years. and it occurred 34 years to the day after iranian militants at the same location seized the u.s. embassy in tehran and took scores of americans hostage. to many in iran, the u.s. remains the great satan, even as the core complaints are updated. >> they wiretap their allies. how can they compromise with their archenemy. >> reporter: in secretary of state john kerry confronted the perception among america's arab allies that president obama is to eager to cut a deal with iran on its nuclear program. >> nothing that we are doing with respect to this negotiation will alter or upset or get in the way of the relationship between the united states and saudi arabia and the relationship in this region. >> reporter: saudi foreign minister denies iran's relationship
in those shadows, but his insights have helped shape the key foreign policy decisions of the last three presidents. the first thing we asked morell about was the last thing he did at the c.i.a.: taking part in the damage assessment on edward snowden, the n.s.a. contractor who leaked classified documents about america's secret electronic surveillance programs. >> mike morell: i do not believe he was a whistleblower. i do not believe he is a hero. i think he has betrayed his country. >> miller: how serious a hit is that to national security? >> morell: i think this is the most serious leak-- the most serious compromise of classified information in the history of the u.s. intelligence community. >> miller: because of the amount of it? or the type? >> morell: the amount and the type. >> miller: but of the hundreds of pages of n.s.a. documents that snowden has leaked, morell pointed to one in particular that has caused a great deal of damage to u.s. intelligence. it's a copy of the top secret document the c.i.a. calls its" black budget." what value would that have to an adversary? >> morell:
and they are very upset. you think what implications will this have not only on foreign policy and trade but what's preventing them from saying screw you to us. >> you know what's preventing them? we're the exceptional nation. what are you going to do? >> i think president obama has serious mending to do and i don't think he deserves the blame but he has a job ahead of him to rebuild the trust. >> we're witnessing a surveillance industrial complex that is increasingly going rogue. it's broader at home and broader abroad than they told the president. >> what they are doing to us. >> i have to be on record i do believe what the president has said this week and i have to be on the r0rd there's a problem when the nsa doesn't tell the president what they are doing at this high level. >> the fans have been weighing in and saying whether they believe the president was ignorant of what the nsa was doing. 46% said the president probably did know about the program. several ways you can get involved here. the poll is up on the facebook page and also on the cycle.msnbc.com. one of the great legal minds of ou
with the overall direction of the foreign policy in the house and senate bills towards a more market based support. it's important to me that we include that in the farm bill. i'm also hopeful we can move away from other market distorting programs. one of the key issues of this conference must be addressed, country of origin labeling or cool. mandatory government run labeling program is not only trade distorting, but does not demonstrate real benefits. i'm confident we can address differences, come together, and timize market based programs to support our farmers and ranchers. we are far apart, and why does the safety net need reform? because people are getting tangled up and stuck in it. the house addresses this by ending benefits for individuals that, quite honestly, do not qualify for them, allowing us to save billions of dollars without cuts assistance to the families in need. this is not weakening nutrition assistance. rather it's about making the program sustainable over the long term. this is a goal i think we can agree on. i'm looking forward to working together on the shared # goals and r
-- on how to achieve a foreign- policy objective. in on personal cell phone calls, does that go too far? guest: our leaders need to apply a balancing test. they have to weigh the foreign intelligence game from such a sensitive axes, like you are saying, in particular intercept of a foreign leader's phone call. a foreign-policy flap would result if it was disclosed. you have to apply that balancing. i think judging from the newspapers that is what the white house is doing this week. they are reviewing the posture of the intelligence community on these collection priorities. are going to apply this test to see what makes sense for the country. appropriate?back guest: it is safe to say the snow back -- the snowden relation did -- revelation caused blowback. host: he was a game changer in all this, would you agree? caller: i think so because this is one of the greatest leaks and compromises in american intelligence in our history. it is the equivalent of giving the other team our playbook. going to be looking back on the snowden years for years to come, perhaps as a point when some of our c
are the implications of this on how we implement foreign policy. it serves as an overarching of the things i would like to see us cover. i would like to start with the first question on the rent we face and why we need security. if there are no benefits, we do not need security. how has the threat of terrorism changed over the past decade and how have our methods adaptive? >> it has changed in relatively significant ways. it is a far more diffuse threat than it was 10 or 15 years ago. it is not necessarily align to buy group, but principally by ideology and other driving fact there's, -- driving factors. secondly, the threat seems to progress at times very rapidly. what may appear to be a localized threat today could be on our doorstep tomorrow. lastly, they do not necessarily appear based on their actions in recent actions are indicators of that. big and complex attacks are their goal or their aim to accomplish their objectives. relatively small in comparison attacks that are relatively simple to put together and execute seem to be a preference. they have the same tools we all have to communicate in a
on people relying on the new health care system. >>> plus, a tough week for the president's foreign policy. new revelations about u.s. spying on allies, including the bugging of the german chancellor's phone. undermines critical relationships at a sensitive time. >>> and does the mideast trust this president? the fallout between syria and iran. the conflicts of global influences ahead. our roundtable is talking about politics and parenting this week after maryland's attorney general is spotted at a beach party where mine oors are drink. and nbc's brian williams reflects on hurricane sandy, one year ago. the wounds that haven't healed on the jersey shore are personal to him. all of that is ahead on "meet the press" on sunday, october 27. >>> from nbc news in washington, the world's longest-running television program, this is "meet the press." >>> and good sunday morning to you. obama care fix is on, but will it work? here are some of the latest developments. the end of november is the timeline the administration is now targeting to have the obama care website running smoothly. the latest re
care system. >>> plus, a tough week for the president's foreign policy. new revelations about u.s. spying on allies, including the bugging of the german chancellor's phone. undermines critical relationships at a sensitive time. >>> and does the mideast trust this president? the fallout between syria and iran. the conflicts of global influences ahead. our roundtable is talking about politics and parenting this week after maryland's attorney general is spotted at a beach party where mine oors are drink. and nbc's brian williams reflects on hurricane sandy, one year ago. the wounds that haven't healed on the jersey shore are personal to him. all of that is ahead on "meet the press" on sunday, october 27. >>> from nbc news in washington, the world's longest-running television program, this is "meet the press." >>> and good sunday morning to you. obama care fix is on, but will it work? here are some of the latest developments. the end of november is the timeline the administration is now targeting to have the obama care website running smoothly. the latest report is that 700,000 appl
interests as a result of this revelation is as important as the foreign policy consequences, because what european company will want to use american networking capacity and other types of computer technologies as a result of this. finally, one other thing. i'm really embarrassed for this white house. i feel awfully sorry for the president because this is basically going to undermine the -- our transatlantic alliance for many years to come, just at a time when we're negotiating an iran agreement. where our european allies are so important to us. >> meanwhile there are some republican leaders coming out, republican congressman peter king defending the u.s. spying on world leaders. take a listen to this. >> i think the president should stop apologizing, stop being defensive. the reality is the nsa has saved thousands of lives, not just in the united states but also in france and germany and throughout europe. and we're not doing this for the fun of it. this is to gather valuable intelligence which helps not just us but also helps the europeans. >> so, mark, we have allies that are upset with
states, through our conduct of foreign policy to the defense matters, to economic matters, and i'm a strong supporter of it. >> of all of it? >> i'm a strong supporter of our generic capability to collect intelligence. i don't want to comment on any one particular controversy or piece of the programs. >> the white house says that president obama did not know about these spy programs on specific world leaders, especially german chancellor angela merkel. obviously you're not a member of the obama administration, but do you find that credible? could it be that there would be surveillance programs of that type that president obama would not know about? >> jake, i'm not going to get into the specifics. it would be inappropriate if there were such a program, i couldn't talk about it. it would be classified. >> do you think the snowden leaks have hurt america's ability to defend itself? >> i do. i think he's a traitor. i think -- i hope we can catch him at some point and that he receives the justice he deserves. >> how have they hurt the united states? i think there are a lot of people,
. and he campaigns on foreign policy. this is where one of everyone's favorite truman stories comes out. shall nominate tells him on a train, go out there and give him hell. theof the reporters -- this -- these things happen. give him hell, harry. cressey had done that before, once when the machines had gotten him elected in missouri, and they fell apart he won on his own personality. >> he was not a great orator. we do not look at truman speeches like a lincoln speeches. in a small group and small crowd to my he to win every by the over. -- crowd, he could when anybody over. >> it wrote to the people. >> what was media coverage like? >> radio and print. he brought a sense of television. it was toward the end. polling was so far ahead that they stopped polling a couple weeks before the election took place. that was why the numbers were so off. >> basement a lot of time on the train. they were always ready. >> they were on the train a lot. >> we do not talk about key west. how did they use key west? go fishing ando swimming. one of the secret service men who used to go with allen said he
to foreign policy, as much as possible you should put partisan politics aside and get the job done. that's what i've always tried to do. i give credit to governor christie for doing it. that's how the country will go forward, not by shutting down the government and not by making everything an overly partisan issue. >> republican congressman of new york, peter king. thanks for coming on today and making time for me. >> thank you. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪avo: sales event is "sback.hen drive" which means it's never been easier to get a new passat, awarded j.d. power's most appealing midsize car, two years in a row. and right now you can drive one home for practically just your signature. get zero due at signing, zero down, zero deposit, and zero first month's payment on any new 2014 volkswagen. hurry, this offer ends october 31st. for details, visit vwdealer.com today. afghanistan in 2009. on the u.s.s. saratoga in 1982. [ male announcer ] once it's earned, usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation because it offers a superior level of protection and because usaa's commi
point out, nsa situation obviously a huge domestic and foreign policy issue, health care is his signature achievement to this point in his presidency. you would think he would be more in the loop is a way of saying it than he has been. >> how much of this shock that's being expressed by the allies just simply to try to get some leverage with the u.s. because everyone knew this was going on and they do it to us and we do it to them. the world of spying. >> you have to express anger this is going on. if you suspected or knew it was going on. they can use it effectively for leverage. the question now is whether or not united states is going to enter into new nonspying agreements with countries they have long resisted entering these agreements with. so whether it's the french or germans, you know, they now have a good deal of leverage to try to negotiate these pacts if they so choose. it's quite possible one result is there will be more nonspying agreements with european allies than there were before. >> i would bet on germany and not on france, just saying. mark mazzetti and chris
with a as reaction to bush who was so dumb. this guy is a genius. is he a policy guy. he is not a policy guy. he is a talker. >> that is it for the panel. stay tuned to see how the president played the odds in foreign policy. at od, whatever business you're in, that's the business we're in. with premium service like one of the best on-time delivery records and a low claims ratio, we do whatever it takes to make your business our business. od. helping the world keep promises. >>> finally tonight, president obama is under fire from world leaders for tapping their cell phones and listening in. one show points out he is really just staying true to his own word. >> true partnership and true progress require constant work and sustained sacrifice. they require allies who will listen to each other, learn from each other, and most of all trust each other. [cheers and applause] >> listen, learn, trust, you know, two out of three ain't bad. >> thanks for inviting us into your home tonight. that is it for this "special report," fair, balanced and unafraid. don't forget tomorrow is a big day on capitol hill.
talking about his heart transplant surgery and foreign policy issues including trusting president obama. >> rose: you don't believe the president of the united states, do you. >> no. >> rose: you don't believe he has the best interest in the united states in terms oour national security in the middle east. >> i don't believe he does. >> rose: and you don't believe his word can gee trusted. >> correct. >> rose: that's serious. >> it certainly is. >> rose: to say that to the president of the united states. >> that's right. >> rose: in a democratic country. >> i think this president is doing damage to our standing, to our capacity to influence events. we are rapidly eroding our ability to have any impact on what's going on in the middle east. i've lived with this disease for 35 years. >> rose: you knew you would die. >> i knew i would die of heart disease. my father had and i expected to but when that time came i was at peace. there was no pain involved or discomfort. it was not frightening. i wanted to talk to my family about final arrangements. it was more difficult for them than
whether it was on economic policy or any particular foreign policy. so the idea that he would be disinengaged is unless something happened, i've never seen in the two years of intensity that i was there, i just don't buy it. >> van jones and newt gingrich still with us. you worked with the president. do you agree with rahm emanuel. >> famously well prepared. frighteningly well prepared. everybody in that building if you wrote it, he was going to read it. the idea he's des ingaged playing golf, that is not this president. something went wrong but the idea the president was not engaged is part part of the story. >> you don't know him as well as van knows him but you've met him. he doesn't seem disengaged to me. >> let's assume for a second he's engaged. that means he knew he wasn't telling the truth when he said you won't lose your insurance. he knew the system wasn't ready on october 1st. which is it? it if he's truly engaged, i'm happy to believe either version. you can make an argument for a president who delegates and trusts his people. if he knew, it was irresponsible to la
foreign policy. so the idea that he would be disengaged, unless something happened, i've never seen in the two years of intensity, i don't buy it. >> is it possible people are not bringing him bad news? >> no. jake, let's go back to this. one of the great strengths of this president, i told him and he always made me -- you know my view having done health care. i was not -- >> you wanted to do a smaller -- >> if you to it, expand kids and family and small business. at a critical juncture when the world was darkest, he said what will you to nodo now.at a criti world was darkest, he said what will you do now.family and smal. at a critical juncture when the world was darkest, he said what will you do now. even though he knew my position, he sought out a contrary position. so you paint pictures because they fit a narrative. you do, okay? we do certain things, you guys do certain things. disengaged. that's how you answer this. the fact is you've now learned it wasn't the national security staff of the united states. it was other european int intelligence operation. it's not like give all
leverage over u.s. foreign policy. moreover, equipping the afghans with russian helicopters will make it virtually impossible to achieve any real level of interoperability between the u.s. and afghan helicopter fleets. the department of defense has repeatedly and disingenuously claimed that a 2011 study of a began -- afghanistan's helicopter requirements shows the necessity of buying mi-17 helicopters from russia. in fact, the unclassified portion of that study found that the ideal aircraft for the afghan military was a particular american-made helicopter. so why are we buying russian helicopters when there are american manufacturers that can meet that very same requirement? makes no sense whatsoever, and the department of defense has steadfastly refused to cooperate with reasonable inquiries into why in the world they continue to persist along this pathway. the reality is the department of defense has plenty of alternatives to buying mi-17's from russia but for some reason or reasons known only to them steadfastly refused to seriously consider any of these alternatives. the most sens
for this president. you know, this president, his foreign policy doctrine, and i think it's a good thing, has relied very strongly on partnerships. this has not been a president who's wanted to cowboy into situations on his own. we will always defend ourselves and our interests unilaterally, but from the very beginning of his presidency, he has wisely, in my way of thinking, emphasized the need to build partnerships. if you're going to try to do that, then instances like this can be particularly corrosive. so the president needs to, with our allies and with the american public, be very clear about what has happened but also about the dramatic steps that are going to be taken to put these programs back into some acceptable form. the american public knows that we've got major security challenges. we have to keep the american public safe. but right now, you know, i think i saw a washington post editorial that said the nsa is losing the benefit of the doubt. they get the benefit of the doubt because they're keeping us safe, but these recent revelations are causing them to lose the benefit of the doubt,
or any particular foreign policy. so the idea he'd be disengaged, unless something happened, i've never seen in the two years of intensity when i was there, i just don't buy it. >> now to the embattled health secretary, kathleen sebelius and her highly anticipated testimony today about obama care and the web site and its failures. our chief congressional correspondent dana bash has more. >> reporter: kathleen sebelius came with a clear sound-bite length mea culpa. >> i apologize. i'm accountable to you for fixing these problems. >> she repeatedly fell on her sword about the problem-plagued obama care web site. >> i told the president that we were ready to go. clearly i was wrong. >> reporter: republicans eagerly pointed out that the web site wasn't even working during this 3 1/2 hour hearing. >> it's been down the whole type you've been testifying. >> reporter: democrats were eager to point out the positive. >> women can no longer be charge more than a man for the same coverage. >> reporter: but some worried web site problems are masking all that and want to be sure it will be fixed by
. this is beyond obama care. this is the whole economy and our foreign policy. >> but if there is no republican leader per se and there isn't. it's a divided party. who is going to tie it together? who is going to be the one to present it to the measure people? it can't be job boehner. nobody knows him, all right? it can't be him. you have got cruise. you have got rubio. you have got christie. christie is a governor though. i don't think is he going to do it. you have got rand paul. it's very hard to get a cohesive message out to the american people when you don't have a messenger. >> but i think what they can do legislatively is they can say, look, there is so much chaos on some levels with what they're claiming their policies are going to do that, frankly, our role is going to be to block what they are trying to do. an extension of obama care. they have got to do that. >> didn't work -- >> -- no, that didn't work, bill, on other things that obama tried. he tried to pivot today back to carbon and the green economy. if he tries any more stuff on that, the republicans have got to say, look, they
with him. and he campaigned with foreign policy, look at what i've done with the marshall plan and the truman doctrine. nominee presidential told him on a train to go out there and give them hell. is then from then on, that what people yelled from everywhere. >> that machine had gotten him elected in missouri. and they fell apart. he ran again on his own. in 1940., >> he must have had a norma's personality. -- huge personality. with small groups and small crowds he could win anyone over. that affected the campaign hugely. >> that got him elected. they brought him to the people. >> what was coverage like at that time? >> print and radio. >> the polling was so far ahead that they stopped polling a couple weeks before the election took place. that was why the numbers were so off. >> they spent a lot of time on the train. they were always ready. >> we do not talk about key west. how did they use key west? >> he used it to go fishing and swimming. one of the secret service men who used to go with said he had a tricky like to do. he'd like to hold you under the water until you though
be able to sort of outmaneuver her on. >> if it does come down to foreign policy in 2016, who would you match up? which on the republican side might be a good nominee to front that? >> someone like rand paul, you know. in particular, because rand paul has been kind of set apart from chris christie. chris christie has done this himself. basically set himself up as the anti-rand paul. rand paul is somebody who has famously made the big speech and has really pushed a lot of the sort of less hawkish, anti-surveillance state, you know, sort of anti-big brother line on the right and has really had a lot of success with that. like i said, hillary is not going to be able to take that line. she's going to end up defending what the administration has done so far. >> peter, you're reading my notes here. i want to play a little bit from senator rand paul on what he said on abc's "this week." take a listen. >> the difference is i take it as an insult and i will not lie down and say people can call me dishonest, misleading or misrepresenting. i have never intentionally done so. and, like i say, if --
around the world with world leaders. in fact, -- every foreign policy issue for the united states over the past three decades. this year he became the first sitting chairman of that committee in over a century to become secretary of state. and just two weeks ago i was honored to travel to asia with senator kerry where we pushed forward key administration initiatives like the trans-pacific partnership. our nation is very lucky to have someone with secretary carries knowledge, and global reach in this leadership position. ladies and gentlemen, let's give a warm welcome to a national hero, a man who has dedicated his life to serve the united states and a tireless can do later who is tackling the tough global issues facing our world. lease help me welcome my friend, secretary of state, john kerry. [applause] >> good morning. thank you. thank you very, very much. thanks so much. thank you, penny, for an extraordinary introduction, and based on that introduction i accept the nomination. [laughter] only kidding. i'm out of that now. i'm out of that now. i'll tell you, about a couple months, b
the case against the challenge for our countries foreign-policy challenges without exercising the risk. we need to reform the food stamp program with better policies. withnot as much concerned programs as i am with policies. the house bill would simply return the food stamp policy to the intent that resident clinton and the congress at that time encouraged individuals to work to receive those benefits. i recognize perception sometimes trumps reality in this town but i hope that asking people to work in return for food stamp not any form of cruel and unusual punishment. the dignity of work has been a common theme throughout the ages. i will be working to avoid placing undue regulatory burdens on our representatives and i want to put the gypsy the -- to rest, and mandatory country of origin labeling has proven to be a failed experiment. i look forward to successful completion of this farm bill so that we can have the uncertainty -- the certainty that our farmers and ranchers deserve. >> the gentleman yields back, the chair recognizes the gentlelady from minnesota. >> thank you very much, mr.
million of us are being spied on as well as the rest of the world. if you want to talk about foreign-policy, i have the democrats and republicans, it is not good. we need to take a step back, look at what we're doing and then make wise choices. thanks. chris from california is next. chris on our independent line. think this nsa program has been way out of line since it began during the bush administration where the american people find out about it. president in our past history called nixon who is spying on a hotel and he was forced to resign. whether obama knew about this or not, he supposed to know this and if he did not know he should resign for lack of ability to do his job heard this is insane what we're doing. we are spying on every human being possible am a friend, foe, everything. example that we are sending to children. do think we can rebuild trust in this issue? inler: i think the trust this country has been down the tubes for the last 15 or 20 years. you can show many examples of that. thes not just the nsa, now tpp has been going on for years now. nobody in this country knows
to congressional arm-twisting, the big reform to incremental change and the big foreign policy ambition to cultivating head of state relationships. it means that obama has appeared to be caught unaware as controversies envelop his administration. the west wing that he runs seems more like liabilities than benefits, raising questions about how much information obama wants and how he receives it. this president doesn't seem to be as relentlessly curious about the process of government. from peter baker -- peter baker writes, those cases underscore the difficult choices in what to tell a president. aides determined that it would be inappropriate for the president to have advanced knowledge of the irs investigation. beresident should not involved in such investigations or law-enforcement cases because it could politicize them. john tuck said he was not bothered asnot as other republicans about mr. obama's not knowing about the problems with the health-care system in advance. i would never put the finger on somebody saying they should have known or might have known. what difference does it m
on foreign policy he was pretty good, terrible on domestic policy. and so i, too, had to fight that public image. and i came out of it quite conflicted. >> host: nicole is in michigan city indiana and nicole, your are on booktv with kitty kelley. >> caller: thank you, ms. kelly. i'm really enjoying the program and i just admire you and i love your approach to writing unauthorized biographies. i'm an aspiring writer myself and i would like to know, how do you start your day, the whole process and starting her books. are you a morning ride, evening writer, what is your process? >> host: what kind of books are you writing? >> caller: well, it's a book on how to get married, because there's a lot of single women, how to get married. [laughter] >> guest: that would be a best seller. >> caller: that's what i'm hoping. and i look at successful women also and how they met their spouses. that i talk to women every day that are in marriages and say, no, how did you major husband. so i'm doing research and also drawing upon my own experience. so how do you start your writing day in which the process
, canada, australia. ashley: has this hurt the u.s. reputation? there has been a number of foreign policy or lack of foreign policy moves that hurt the u.s. reputation. is this another one just added to the pile so to speak? >> if this had come along alone it might have gotten sorted out. i think a lot of europeans and others are quite concerned about the veracity, franklily of the, the administration. and, how much you can rely on their promises. with respect to syria, we virtually said yes, we're going to help. we turned it off at the last minute. it is almost, sometimes, as if it is better to be an enemy of the united states than a friend if you look the way mubarak was dealt with on the one hand. and the way assad is being dealt with on the other. tracy: just to follow up on that, in your article in the journal i thought was so telling. you wrote, we were not leading but rather stumbling along behind. stumbling like a little kid that doesn't know which way to go. is that how you think the world perceives us? >> to some extent, yes. we need to work on this working closely with the alli
, that intelligence capability is enormously important to the united states, to our conduct of foreign policy, to the fed's matters, to economic matters and i'm a strong supporter of it. >> reporter: the director of national intelligence, james clapper announced overnight he's declassifying a trove of documents about collection under the foreign intelligence surveillance act or fisa. later today, clapper and the head of the nsa, keith alexander will be testifying on the hill. kate, we can expect them to face hard questions as well. we'll try to ask some of our own. >> absolutely. review on multiple fronts but what will come of it? jim sciutto, great to see you. thank you so much. >>> the obama administration is facing ongoing criticism on another front. obama care. the president'sed visors are fighting back on twitter, challenging claims millions of people could lose coverage because of the law. the administration is extending the signup window by six weeks. senior white house correspondent brianna keilar is here with the very latest. >> that signup deadline now march 31st. it had been februa
, there are real risks of disclosure. so it's kind of the classic foreign policy dilemma that you have very modest tactical benefits and a huge strategic risk. that has now blown up in our faces. >> bill? >> i would say if you're going to eavesdrop on phone calls of the german chancellor, that has to be something that the president of the united states authorizes and thinks frankly is worth the risk of exposure, as nick says. you can't just have the bureaucracy doing that. i would like to know, did this president or the previous president, for that matter, sanction that and if so, maybe they thought it was worth it. i don't have a principled problem with listening to other people's calls, even some allies, if we think it's important. you shouldn't do it in a haphazard way which generally damages relations with the real ally. >> do you think it's true that the president of the united states would not know that the nsa is listening in to angela merkel's phone conversations? >> you know, i'm a little mystified by that. i talked today to a former senior cia official and asked about that, and this pers
comment on our foreign policy by former vice president dick cheney. listen to this. >> i think our friend no longer count on us, no longer trust us and our adversaries don't fear us. that is the cornerstone and base of u.s. ability and influence. if we're not heavily involved there, if we turned our back on the region, if we have a president who believes we overreacted to the terrorism attacks on 9/11, i think the saudis, the emiratis, egyptians, many in that part of the world no longer have confidence in the united states. martha: does this president lack confidence or even respect to some extent from some of these world leaders and is that part of the reason that we're seeing this kind of outrage about all this? >> by all accounts president obama does not have close personal relationships with foreign leaders the way reagan did with thatcher or bill clinton did with tony blair or president bush with angela merkel for that matter or with sarkozy. in the middle east he had very inconsistent policy for instance with syria. he basically told france by all accounts that we were going to atta
it sooner? in foreign policy, doing the right thing is not the only thing. you also have to do the right thing at the right time. why did it take so long to reach this conclusion? and now we find ourselves in a situation where fighting on behalf of those who promote freedom and liberty and tolerance is harder than ever and may be impossible. why did we do this, but sooner? -- why did we not do this, but sooner? it is harder than ever and might be impossible. >> the syrian opposition from the beginning was atomized. that is how it survived the regime's oppression. there was no national leadership. it is very hard to build up something that itself is still very incoherent. it took a long time for the opposition coalition to come together. you are right, we only recognized it in december, 2012. but it was only formed in mid- november. we recognized it as the legitimate representative three weeks after it was established. we have reduced the syrian embassy to the officer. and frankly, that officer is there because a lot of the syrian americans here want a syrian task force and he is able --
congress and campaigns on foreign policy. but that the marshall plan and one of everyone's favorite driven stories comes out the vice-presidential nominee tells him on the train go out there and give them hell harry and the reporter hears that and then that is what people yelled at him. give them hell harry. . . >> they stopped pulling before the election took place. that's why the numbers were so off. >> did beth campaign with him >> >> yes, they were on the train, exhausted. >> >> we didn't talk about key west, and they saw the white out, and i wonder if they visited key west. how? >> well, he used it to go fishing and swimming, and one of the secret servicemen who used to go with him or exscout had a trick he liked to do, hold you under the water until you were almost dead, but it was mostly men and men things. he liked the company of men, all that stuff, and ms. truman didn't go many times, but she would go. margaret had a public persona. she was kind of easy with the press and things like that. people liked her. >> watching some what's calledded footage withou
by chemical weapons, the obama administration was caught on its heels in a foreign policy quandary. america was reminded again that the united states must always be vigilant and embrace an international relations framework which enables proactive engagement rather than merely reactionary crisis response. mr. speaker, i desperately hope that these discussions will proceed in the context of the grave reality the human family will face if nuclear weapons fall into the handles of jihadists in iran. to use the slight hely altered words of our secretary of state, mr. speaker, quote, in a world of terrorists and extremists, we ignore these risks at our peril. we simply cannot afford to have nuclear weapons become the i.e.d. or car bomb of tomorrow. neither our country nor our conscience can bear the costs of inaction. mr. speaker, the u.s.-iran nuclear negotiations act is, quote, an action that will reinforce the prohibition against nuclear weapons development. we're talking about actions that will degrade iran's capacity to use these weapons and ensure that they do not proliferate. with this aut
on economic policy or any particular foreign policy. so the idea that he would be disengaged, unless something has happened, i've never seen in the two years of intense legitimate i was there, i just don't buy it. >>> kathleen sebelius and her highly anticipated testimony today about obama care, the website and its failures. dana bash has more. >> kathleen sebelius came with a clear sound bite length mea culpa. >> i apologize. i'm accountable to you for fixing these problems. >> reporter: she repeatedly fell on her sword about the operable-plagued obama care website. >> i told the president that we were ready to go. clearly i was wrong. >> republicans eagerly pointed out the website wasn't even working during the 3 1/2-hour hearing. >> it's been down the whole time i've been testifying. >> democrats were eager to point out the positive. >> women can no longer be charged more than a man for the same coverage. >> some worried website problems are masking all that and want to be sure it would be fixed by the new november 30th deadline. >> do you have full conformed in this new hard date? >> i kno
in broad daylight. >>> president obama is hearing tough new criticism of his foreign policy. in an interview yesterday former vice president dick cheney said he doesn't trust the president -- trust the president to stand behind israel and keep nuclear weapons out of iran. >> you don't believe he has the best interests of the united states in terms of our national security in the middle east? >> i don't believe he does. >> you don't believe his word can be trusted? >> correct. >> that's a serious question. >> it certainly is. >> to say that to the president of the united states. >> that's right. >> in a democratic country. >> but i think this president is doing enormous damage to our standing, to our capacity to influence events. we are rapidly eroding our ability to have any impact on what's going on in the middle east. the last time we walked away from afghanistan, for example, back in the '80s, we'd been there heavily involved supporting the move against the soviets but then we turned around after the soviets departed. they got a civil war and osa
is my question. sooner?'t we do it in foreign policy, doing the right thing is not the only thing. you also have to do the right thing at the right time. why did it take so long to reach this conclusion? and now we find ourselves in a situation where fighting on behalf of those who promote freedom and liberty and tolerance is harder than ever and may be impossible. why did we do this, but sooner? -- why did we not do this, but sooner? >> the syrian opposition from the beginning was atomized. that is how it survived the regime's oppression. there was no national leadership. it is very hard to build up something that itself is still very incoherent. it took a long time for the opposition coalition to come together. you are right, we only recognized it in december, 2012. but it was only formed in mid- november. we recognized it as the legitimate representative three weeks after it was established. we have reduced the syrian to the officer. and frankly, that officer is there because a lot of the syrian americans here want a syrian task force and he is able to issue them. if i may continue,
this very important foreign-policy matter going forward. >> time for some fresh thinking in terms of u.s. policy in the post-pullout? >> we are focused on providing the necessary assistance to a iraq to help them combat terrorism as well as the broader assistance to provide through the strategic framework agreement. that encompasses not just the security relationship, but an economic and political relationship. part of this -- part of what a for has been going to many years now is the efforts to resolve the political differences and divisions within that country peacefully and through politics rather than through file it conflict. violent conflict. the forces of al qaeda have been trying to disrupt that throughout this time. it is important that in spite of the differences that exist politically in the iraq that the parties and groups continues to resolve their differences peacefully, which further isolates the activities that al qaeda and him and straights what they are for all to see, which terribleeking of violence on innocent civilians which is damaging to every iraqi. our systems
the region. but foreign policy is not a zero-sum game. if we can find ways to resolve disputes peacefully, we are wise to explore them. engagement is not appeasement, nor is it containment. we know what those are, we know where they lead, and we will not pursue them. and president obama has repeatedly made clear that words are not enough. action must match words. we understand why this is so important to so many people. because we've all been to yad vashem. earlier this year, i had the opportunity to revisit yad vashem. i had been there before, but this time was special for, because i brought my son, ziller, with me. i wanted him to see the harsh realities of the depths of evil, and the beautiful tribute to the victims of the past. yad vashem is an instruction for future generations -- like all great memorials. a warning to never ever again stand idly by in the face of hatred and bigotry. we know that ridding our world of hatred takes more than just work, imagination, and so on. it will always demand commitment, sacrifice, and courage. it demands that we must continue to march our armies of t
in asia. asia is the focal point of this administration's foreign policy. the pivot we have discussed frequently. withrip will be in keeping intense focus the president has brought to bear on our relationships in the region and on our presence in the region. this will be a continuation of the work the president has done. that the president looks forward to speaking with the vice president about the trip before he goes and getting a readout on his return. according to a news report, nsa has several [indiscernible] beijing and hong kong. will this be an issue between the vice president and his counterparts in china? comment on specific reported intelligence gathering activities. what i am confident of is when the vice president travels and has meetings with counterparts in foreign countries that every topic is on the table. he said get back to us on the answer to that, is the president rolling out fundraising for any and credit super pac for the coming cycle? >> i have not had a single conversation about 2014. you and get back to you to the extent we have answers on these questions. but
goals, foreign relationships, and her policy toward pyongyang. her departure for europe, she told the bbc that it is hard to trust the north korean leader, because he did not honor his promises, but that any provocation by pyongyang would carry a huge price tag, and her country would never accept a nuclear-armed north korea. >> we cannot repeat the vicious cycle of the past, where north korea's nuclear threats and provocations were met with and then followed by renewed provocations and threats. otherwise, north korea will continue to further advance its nuclear capability, and will come to a point where this situation will be even harder to crack. we will not be talking about whether north korea should or should not possess nuclear weapons. but their demands will creep to such an extent that they will be calling for arms reduction or arms talks. and it will be more difficult to deal with this issue. >> after decades of failed negotiations and nuclear tests, pyongyang is getting closer to a deliverable nuclear weapon. it's long-range rocket launch last year, and its most recent nuc
is in trouble, whether in foreign col se policy or domest, congressman tray goudie joining us next. this is the quicksilver cash back card from capital one. it's not the "juggle a bunch of rotating categories" card. it's not the "sign up for rewards each quarter" card. it's the no-games, no-messing-'round, no-earning-limit-having, do-i-look-like-i'm-joking, turbo-boosting, heavyweight-champion- of-the-world cash back card. this is the quicksilver cash back card from capital one. unlimited 1.5% cash back on every purchase, everywhere, every damn day. now, tell me, what's in your wallet? at od, whatever business you're in, that's the business we're in with premium service like one of the best on-time delivery records and a low claims ratio, we do whatever it takes to make your business our business. od. helping the world keep promises. ido more with less with buss energy.hp is help. soon, the world's most intelligent servers, designed by hp, will give ups over twice the performance, using forty percent less energy. multiply that across over a thousand locations, and they'll provide t
is in trouble, whether in foreign col se policy or domest, >> senator jeff sessions today announcing that the department of health and human services quietly dropped a no-bid contract that would have promoted obamacare to prisoners, this condition cancellation aftr sessions asked hhs why they chose to create a special program for prisoners when they spent certain million on -- $ 70s million on so-called obama navigators for everyone. they pointed to a community add vo cassie organization, based in chicago, it appears daylight, is still an ant septic for all sorts of things. >> first obama administration toivonennintestify, before a hoe committee apologized, then maintained sim is working. -- system is working. the head. the centers for medicare and medicaid services construct what is the very least an alternative universe. >> we have a system that is working, we'll improve the speed of that system. >> excuse me. -- >> yes. >> you are saying the system right now is working? >> i'm saying it is working, it is just not working at the speed we want and the success rate wement. those are
about the u.s. investment climate and the government policy on attracting foreign investment, some of those policies include immigration, the debt ceiling, and energy. it is moderated. [applause] >> good morning everyone. lou, thank you -- lew, thank you for your excellent remarks. thank you to both of them for their leadership. it has been outstanding for the subject matter we have before us these next few days. their insights as it applies to the business community are very valuable to all of us that are joining us today. we are off to a great start to what promises to be a gay -- great conference and agenda. thank you to all who has come great distances to be with us today. i am very pleased to announce our first panel that is entitled usa?hy select the perspectives on operating in the united states." this'll be a very informative and invaluable discussion. it is also my pleasure to introduce that moderator of this panel, an important member of president obama's white house team, valerie jarrett. a senior adviser to the president and a longtime confidant of the president. she ov
, that intelligence capability is enormously important to the united states, to our conduct, our foreign policy, to defense matters, to economic matters, and i am a strong supporter of it. >> the director of national intelligence james clapper announced overnight he is declassifying a trove of documents about the collection under the foreign intelligence surveillance acts, or first ssa. later today, clapper and the head of the nsa, keith alexen direction will be testify on the hill about that program. you can be sure they're going to be getting questions about spying overseas, how far it should go and what limits the administration is considering placing on it now. >> this is a huge story, especially in europe. jim sciutto, thank you very much. >>> republican senator lindsey graham turning up the heat on the obama administration for its handling of last year's benghazi rror attack and its aftermath. the outspoken critic of the administration is threatening to block all presidential nomination, before the senate until survivors of that attack testify before congress. take a listen to graham on f
in just one month. how this could affect u.s. foreign policy on fighting terrorism and is other key issues, we expect to hear more on the white house news conference scheduled to begin in 90 minutes kyla campbell ktvu channel 2 news. >>> and diane feinstein plans to give continued authority. she heads the senate select committee on intelligence. they are drafting legislation to put restrictions on the nsa phone records program. the legislation would allow the nsa to continue gathering records listing the numbers, time and duration of all u.s. telephone calls but not their content the. >>> time is 8:15. well, this week marks the first anniversary of superstorm sandy. one of the nation's worst natural disaster. this morning historic ellis island will reopen for the first time since that big storm slammed into new york harbor. superstorm sandy ravaged the island, left it without power for several months. the clean up work is far from over despite the reopening today. ellis island is best known as you know for ushering millions of immigrants into the united states over the years. now, a lot oa
conduct of foreign policy to the defense matters, for economic matters, and i'm a strong supporter of it." >> reporter: jim sciutto, cnn washington. >> major league baseball's all-time home run leader has asked a federal appeals court to reconsider its refusal to overturn his felony obstruction conviction. barry bonds' legal team filed the request with the 9th u.s. circuit court of appeals in san francisco. a three-judge panel of the 9th circuit upheld bonds' conviction in september. a jury found him guilty in april 2011. bonds is asking the court to assemble a special panel of 11 judges to rehear the case. bonds argues that he was wrongfully convicted of obstruction of justice for giving a rambling but truthful answer during a 2003 grand jury appearance. >> jon lester was superb once again as the boston red sox took a three-games-to- two lead in the world series. lester pitched into the eighth inning for the second time in the fall classic as the sox knocked off st. louis 3-1 in game 5. the lefty held the cardinals to a run and four hits while striking out seven over 7 2/3 innings. card
about whether it was on economic policy or foreign policy, so the idea that he would be disengaged is unless something happened, i have never seen in the two years of intensity when i was there, i just don't buy it. >> so a very forceful defense of president obama by his first white house chief of staff. one other thing that was interesting is mayor emanuel when he was chief of staff, brooke, he was very open about suggesting that there not be this very ambitious widespread attempt to reform health care in this country. he thought it should be a more incremental approach, expanding health care for children and small businesses, but president obama disagreed with him. he talked about that at length also in terms of president obama wanting to hear opposing points of view, brooke. >> as you point out, the president speaking in a matter of minutes from boston, then we'll watch for you, jake tapper, and watch for this interview with the now current mayor of chicago, rahm emanuel. "the lead" starts in just a couple minutes. thank you, sir, for that. >>> before i let you know, coming up,
of democratic leaders on foreign policy in the senate. it was a real warning shot. it was a letter to obama but it was really a broadside against and it said he is doing a of things wrong and has not fulfilled his promises and his governing -- and he is governing as a sectarian warlord and the u.s. is not holding him to account for it. he is allowing too much influence by iran which is also shiite which is the same as his government. they called that a malign influence which is one of the stronger terms applied recently. concerns really are, as i laid out in the context of the apaches, that since 2011, al- maliki has promised a number of times to have an inclusive power-sharing government. one was nominally set up. by the account of john mccain and others who wrote that has set abouti to dismantle that government or undermine it. he is accompanied this trip by a sunni defense minister and a ministero foreign representing other blocs. is that that is just for show and that he really intends to continue to govern from a shiite-first perspective and so far, he has been able to essentially
. it was signed by the most influential republican and a couple democratic leaders on foreign policy in the senate and it was a real warning shot. it was a letter to obama but it was really a broadside against maliki and it said, you know, he's doing any number of things wrong. he's, he hasn't fulfilled previous promises. he is governing, these were not the his words but he is governing as a sectarian warlord and the u.s. is not holding him to account for it and he is allowing too much influence by next door iran which of course is also shiite as is he, as is his government-led coalition n fact they called that aid maligned influence which is one of the stronger terms applied recently. and the, the concerns really are, as i laid out in the context of the apaches, look, i mean, since 2011 maliki has promised any number of times to have a, inclusive power-sharing government. in fact one was nominally set up, by the, account of john mccain and others who wrote that letter. maliki hashn said about systematically either dismantling that government or undermining it. and although he is accompanied here
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